Fun Thanksgiving Stories

Every American family has them: memorable Thanksgiving stories, tales that are told & retold at the Thanksgiving table

Here are a few unforgettable ones:

  • The Thanksgiving Day my sister called the Butterball Turkey Hotline to ask: What to do with a grilled turkey burned to a charcoal husk? The answer: scrape off the char to the meat below and enjoy!
  • Then there was the Thanksgiving uncle threw the turkey out the kitchen window.  A little early with the holiday cheer perhaps?
  • Among my earliest Thanksgiving memories are packing up my father’s turkey dinner to deliver to the police station where he worked the midnight shift.  The cold & quiet village streets, my siblings & I shyly delivering his meal, smiling to the police officers on duty
  • And the memories of food: my first shrimp with cocktail sauce, the delicious cool & spicy treat of salami rolled with cream cheese, the delectable combination of turkey, mashed potato, gravy, spicy turnip & veg piled high on the plate, flavors mingling to enhance the whole

Care to share your Thanksgiving memories?  Thanksgiving is the day we celebrate all that we are grateful for.  For my family the greatest gift is being together for the first time in five years.

While you are going down memory lane consider these Fun Thanksgiving Facts:

  • 248 million:The number of turkeys expected to be raised in the United States in 2011
  • 46.5 million:  The preliminary estimate of turkeys Minnesota is expected to raise in 2011. Minnesota was tops in turkey production, followed by North Carolina (30.0 million), Arkansas (30.0 million), Missouri (18.0 million), Virginia (17.5 million) and Indiana (16.0 million). These six states together account for about two-thirds of U.S. turkeys produced in 2011
  • 750 million pounds:  The forecast for U.S. cranberry production in 2011
  • 2.4 billion pounds:  The total weight of sweet potatoes — another popular Thanksgiving side dish — produced by major sweet potato producing states in 2010
  • 1.1 billion pounds:  Total production of pumpkins in the major pumpkin-producing states in 2010. Illinois led the country by producing 427 million pounds of the vined orange gourd. Pumpkin patches in California, New York and Ohio also provided lots of pumpkins: Each state produced at least 100 million pounds. The value of all pumpkins produced by major pumpkin-producing states was $117 million
  • 266.1 million pounds:  If you prefer cherry pie, you will be pleased to learn that the nation’s forecasted tart cherry production for 2011 totals 266.1 million pounds, up 40 percent from the 2010 production. Of this 2011 total, the overwhelming majority (210.0 million pounds) will be produced in Michigan
  • 2.01 billion bushels:  The total volume of wheat — the essential ingredient of bread, rolls and pie crust — produced in the United States in 2011
  • 656,340 tons:  The 2011 contracted production of snap (green) beans in major snap (green) bean-producing states. Of this total, Wisconsin led all states (258,320 tons). Many Americans consider green bean casserole a traditional Thanksgiving dish
  • $7.8 million:  The value of U.S. imports of live turkeys from January through July of 2011 — 99.7 percent from Canada. When it comes to sweet potatoes, the Dominican Republic was the source of 60.1 percent ($3.2 million) of total imports ($5.3 million). The United States ran a $3.6 million trade deficit in live turkeys during the period but had a surplus of $41.7 million in sweet potatoes
  • 13.3 pounds:  The quantity of turkey consumed by the typical American in 2009, with no doubt a hearty helping devoured at Thanksgiving time.  Per capita sweet potato consumption was 5.3 pounds
  • $1.38:  Retail cost per pound of a frozen whole turkey in December 2010

Source:  US Census Bureau Facts for Features: Thanksgiving Day: Nov. 24, 2011
http://www.census.gov/newsroom/releases/archives/facts_for_features_special_editions/cb11-ff21.html

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